Carcinogenic Poetry: Top Ten No. 3

Be Alone

I wish it were
ten, no eleven
years ago
I was 20
drunk high
bruised crimson
bloody making angels
in the powdered snow.
It all made sense
the water the dark the light
the wet
melted into my hips
my heart
but I woke up
and I knew
exactly where I
was supposed to
Be.


Isn’t That Lovely

Ashton, 4, and I
walking outside together
this morning, the
air was moist
and unusually warm
Holding hands, he asked, “Mommy,
what’s that mell?”
“That sssmmell,” I smiled and answered
“is the sun, earth, water, and trees.”
We both took in
more air and in
A sweet dewy breath
he reflected,
“It mells like the clouds.”
“Of course it does,” I whispered
watching the clouds floating
there in his big
blue eyes.

Tara Channtelle Hill is 31, an aspiring poet/writer and post-baccalaureate student at Northern Michigan University.

Carcinogenic Poetry: Top Ten crystallizes the journal between 2009 and 2015, sharing the most read posts to date. Presented from final poem to the top of the set, Tara’s poem was published on Tuesday, February 1, 2011 and was the eighth most read post at Carcinogenic Poetry.

Carcinogenic Poetry: Top Ten No. 2

On a Sunday Afternoon

I.C.E. bled though our door packing heat.
We took the lead,

marched in front
of a jittery virgin

trigger-finger ready
to earn his gold-stitched vest.

We fetched stained papers
masked in plastic

& jolted from the blast
of a tailpipe backfiring,

calling like winter
from a shallow puddle.

They checked us & slid out.
Their van melted into

every tinted van,
so we babbled like Patriots.

When no one was looking,
the floor rotted in stagnant water.

Marcelo Hernandez is an avid dancer, carpenter, and handy man. He is an undergraduate student at Cal State Sacramento and the new 2010/11 poetry section editor for Calaveras Station. He won first place in the undergraduate poetry section of the Bazzannela literary award and is recipient of the Warmdal and Willhelm Memorial Scholarships. He lives in Yuba City, California.

Carcinogenic Poetry: Top Ten crystallizes the journal between 2009 and 2015, sharing the most read posts to date. Presented from final poem to the top of the set, Marcelo’s poem was published on Saturday, December 11, 2010, and was the ninth most read post at Carcinogenic Poetry.

Carcinogenic Poety: Top Ten No.1

Pointed—That Beam of Light

That beam of light upon your face
reveals the blush of summer gone from it.
And now, treatment for a reflective era:

Evening.
She creeps over the trees
and valleys on multiple legs
of brittle iron poles.

An expanding barracks
not fluttering
but oozing in mile-high wafts
and we are pointed toward her
hurtling into the East.

Emerging evening;
a cold blanket with rusted edges,
replacing daylight
with a fickle promise of dreams.

Instead,
she fills the sleeping gulf
with ideas of living acts
never committed, never actualized,
hardly remembered.

Finally alone,
this is the river we speak to—
Grey, broad, shallow, leafless, birds leaving it,
and bridged.
An expanse best fled from.
A kept secret. A mute response.

And then above,
the sirens spiral around it.
Just beyond the periphery
lies your rock island,
a glowing carnelian outpost.
The final gateway into spring.

Youssef Alaoui-Fdili is a Moroccan-American Latino. His family and heritage are an endless source of inspiration for his varied, dark, spiritual and carnal writings. He has an MFA in Poetics from New College of California. His poems have appeared in Exquisite Corpse, a Swiss publication called Poems Niederngasse, Stark Raving Normal, Oakland’s Literary Zine Tea Party, the New Times of San Luis Obispo and San Francisco’s Cherry Bleeds. He is also a founding member of the East Bay writers group “9st.”

Carcinogenic Poetry: Top Ten crystallizes the journal between 2009 and 2015, sharing the most read posts to date. Presented from final poem to the top of the set, Youssef’s poem was published on Monday, August 1, 2011, and was the tenth most read post at Carcinogenic Poetry.